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Jesse_Fairburn
02-07-2011, 03:11 PM
hey guys, i have a few questions for side control and was hoping to get some feedback if possible.

is it better to be on your knees in SC or prone with ur hips low. i find whenever im on my knees im put back into guard/halfguard right away. now im finding if i keep my legs stretched and my hips low, it puts lots of weight on the opponent, and if they try sneaking their legs under i block with my hips, like a sprawl. i just find i dont get as many sub attempts when i do this. any ideas?

AJ Camacho
02-07-2011, 03:18 PM
I had/have the same problem. I try to keep my side mount as dynamic as possible often switching between standard side, scarf hold, and twister side depending on where their inside arm and hips are.

Tyler Timmermans
02-07-2011, 03:33 PM
here is a drill from another thread


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bi5spJJyAOE&feature=player_embedded#

stlnl
02-07-2011, 03:54 PM
I block the hips with the knee and drop the hip closest to their head to the floor. When I walk around to the other side, I tend to put both hips on the floor.

IMO the only time you should be on both knees in side control is after securing complete control of the near side arm (trapping it near the guy's head with your hip and pulling him up onto you a bit) and that is damn near impossible to do to someone who is even in grappling ability with you. I dont count transitions to mount, since they are not control positions as much as transitions.

Chris Herzog
02-07-2011, 04:40 PM
On the knees for sure, sprawled out is too easy to replace 1/2 guard and its very difficult to transition to submissions from side control when your sprawled out.

Couple of pointers that should help:

1)You job should be to eliminate space(the person escaping should be attempting to create space), like vacuum sealing some frozen veggies, no gaps.

2)Knees tight to their body, I prefer one in their ear, the other tight to their hip. Sit you butt back over your heels.

3)Chest pressure should be constant. You pressure should start on the near side of their body and press down and across to the far side (think of kneading dough with a rolling pin), but never driving across to the far side, make sure you keep your hips down, with your butt back over your heels.

4)"Destroy the near arm". Take away his power base, and he won't be able to create space to replace his guard. There are a number of methods to do this. A common one I teach: Switch your hips to scarf hold when he pushes off your hip to create space, then scissor your legs bringing you knee under his arm up to his ear transitioning back to side control with his arm now over his head, like he's raising his arm to ask a question. It is very difficult to create space to escape once you’ve destroyed the arm.

Hope these help.

Mike Noronowicz
02-07-2011, 04:51 PM
my ribs and chest are sore from doing something like this in our open mat ,,,uh i thought i had cracked ribs or something ,.
any tips on strengthening a rib cage ???

Jim Allen
02-07-2011, 10:17 PM
I will absolutely be borrowing the "vacuum seal the frozen veggies" analogy in the future. I like the way you put that. :)

AndyK5
02-08-2011, 03:54 AM
Chris Herzog +1
This is what we are being taught too, great advice.

Harry Evans
02-08-2011, 11:12 AM
I was just getting advice on this from one of our brown belts yesterday. First of all, it depends on your body type. If you are short and stout, you can just be on both knees and be really heavy. I am tall and lanky, so Heidi (brown belt) suggested I spend more time with a hip connection then knee. In other words, either plant the hip near their head on your opponent's shoulder/neck line and face the legs (like TSC), or plant your lower hip on their hip to stop the guard-recovery and face their head (like Judo side control or scarf position, except with the far side underhook, and pulling up on the close arm). Makes you way heavier, especially where they want to replace their guard. You just have to remember that on your knees is a more threatening spot, with more attacks, while on your side is better for being heavy, making life miserable, and maintaining position. I try to go to my side, wait until the guy stops bucking, and then go to my knees to attack.

Harry Evans
02-08-2011, 11:15 AM
also, especially for the "on both knees" side control, Chris Herzog +1. Says it all.

@ Chris, thanks for the part on sitting your butt back on your heels, that's definitely what has been causing me problems. If you are lanky, how do you maintain chest pressure and keep your weight from going to far over at the same time? I feel like the farther back I sit, the lighter I feel

Chris Herzog
02-08-2011, 01:06 PM
also, especially for the "on both knees" side control, Chris Herzog +1. Says it all.

@ Chris, thanks for the part on sitting your butt back on your heels, that's definitely what has been causing me problems. If you are lanky, how do you maintain chest pressure and keep your weight from going to far over at the same time? I feel like the farther back I sit, the lighter I feel

Its my experience its easier for taller lanky guys to maintain constant pressure, as the larger the surface area the more weight distribution, creating a "blanket" effect. You may be lighter, however its harder to escape side control with pressure from multiple angles. Make sure you are "kneading the dough" using your chest as a rolling pin into the upper side of their chest/side then across (multi direction pressure), rather than just "laying" right on top of their chest( single directional pressure). Also remember Jiu Jitsu is live and shouldn't be stagnant, be prepared to make adjustments, destroying the near arm should help with some of those adjustments.

Also how you prioritize your goals with side control will help you better determine what your trying to accomplish. Do you try to finish from side control? Do you have specific submissions your trying to work? Does you opponents movements (escape attempts) help set up your submissions? Or are you just using side control as a way point on the way to the mount?etc.

When I use side control I have two means of attacking:
1) I'm actively seeking out submission or positions from my personal attacking system. (ex. I'm actively working the farside under hook, pressurizing their head, to step over to a Kimura.).
2) My opponent is active from the bottom, and I'm trying to capitalize on his movements to set up a submission or transition to another dominate position. (ex. he turns in for a single, I whizzer and attack with a D'arce or Japanese Necktie).

Knowing what your working towards will help you understand what you actually need to fix.

Jason_C
02-08-2011, 01:13 PM
i usually go right for twister and im flexible enough to mount regardless if they are trying to block with their legs or not. Another thing i go for is feed my arm behind their head and in front of their bicep. Then with my other arm, ill push up that arm i just isolated. ill then extend that arm and leverage prevents them from driving it back down. its sort of a one armed full nelson. there are arm bars and neck cranks from there that i could show. i guess ill just have to make a video someday.

Harry Evans
02-10-2011, 11:41 AM
Thanks for the advice. Prioritizing should help a lot, and the tall person = bigger blanket idea is really interesting. I always thought of the blanket as "not as wide", but thinking about increasing surface area should help a ton.

Chris Herzog
02-10-2011, 02:07 PM
Thanks for the advice. Prioritizing should help a lot, and the tall person = bigger blanket idea is really interesting. I always thought of the blanket as "not as wide", but thinking about increasing surface area should help a ton.

Anytime brotha, I hope it helps.