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Thread: Rubber Guard

  1. #1

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    Rubber Guard

    Don't think I've heard it or or seen anyone mention it when doing RG. Is it not really important when you holding a position like mission control that you move your hips in the correct way so that the flexibility depends on your hip flexibility and not your knees which couldn't be good for you.

    If so what is the correct hip movement/placement for left leg mission control? Tips etc.

  2. #2
    David Ogg's Avatar
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    Try not to be straight on in mission control.

    Use your right foot on the hip to push off a little so your left hip ends up slightly higher than the right.

    If you keep pushing your opponent away either on his hip or left knee with your right foot, you'll flatten them out a bit n seriously improve the angle you are in.

    So just try to be off the left side a bit with that hip higher.

    That's what works for me but then, I am just a white belt lol. I'm sure someone else will have better advice

  3. #3
    Brent Smith's Avatar
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    Always important to have the correct angle. The more turned you are the wrong way the more stress is put on your knee. Although some people have better flexibility than some so that plays into it as well.

  4. #4
    Phill Schwartz's Avatar
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    I don't have great knee flexibility so I hip way out to play RG. Rubber Guard is actually more about hip flexibility than knee flex so the more you let your hips move the more flex you have to throw up mission control or NY. Then once you get there and you get the high guard established you often have to square back up to advance with the 2nd leg into crack head etc.

  5. #5
    Tom Carbone's Avatar
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    If someone is pressuring you down against the side you want to get to, use a little sweep attempt just to get them to pressure off and give you some space back.

  6. #6

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    RUBBER GUARD DOESNT WORK, ITS JUST A CRAZY ATTEMPT TO BREAK YOUR OWN LEGS........ lol just kidding guys. but you need that angle on the side, even with mission control.

    i think eddie says that when youre breaking him down and doing the sit up, head control and then falling into crappy mission control, you should fall to your side to get that angle right from the start.

    i find that being smaller makes it harder to get anywhere from mission control and even new york, so i skip it and look for flying new yorks and chill dogs. when you have chill dog you can get an angle without much effort because you can also use your forearm against their neck to push them away or push yourself away.

    lastly, your knees are more important than keeping rubber guard, dont worry too much if you have to let it go ad start again.

  7. #7
    Eddie Bravo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Smith View Post
    Always important to have the correct angle. The more turned you are the wrong way the more stress is put on your knee. Although some people have better flexibility than some so that plays into it as well.
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  8. #8

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    Brent's post is dead on!
    It's a game of inches. Like the interview Eddie had with JJ Machado. JJ said that if something like your elbow is like an inch off either way, it could mean the difference between being in a good position or being in real deep trouble.
    I have a crap left knee - the knee cap intermittently dislocates and floats off to one side (gross right).
    So I have to be super conscious about where the pressure goes on what joint, so if I feel it too much in my knee, it know my angles are off and I adjust.

  9. #9

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    It can be tough to get the correct angle sometimes with just a push from the foot in the hip, depending on your opponent's pressure. I've found that also pushing away with your forearm thats pressed against the collar bone can go a long way

  10. #10
    Tony "The Goods" Garcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkenneth View Post
    Brent's post is dead on!
    It's a game of inches. Like the interview Eddie had with JJ Machado. JJ said that if something like your elbow is like an inch off either way, it could mean the difference between being in a good position or being in real deep trouble.
    I have a crap left knee - the knee cap intermittently dislocates and floats off to one side (gross right).
    So I have to be super conscious about where the pressure goes on what joint, so if I feel it too much in my knee, it know my angles are off and I adjust.
    I was told jiu jitsu was a game of inches in 1992. It wasn't until training with Brandon Mccaghren, Bobby Rivers, and Sean Applegate that I've learned it's a game of millimeters.

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